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Full text of "The Cycle"

SORRY FOR THE DELAY 




(is back) 



VOL. 3 NO. 7 



FITCHBURG STATE COLLEGE STUDENT NEWSPAPER 



STUDENTS HAVE SPOKEN 

SO BE IT 



RICE 



HOLZMANN 



O'REILLY 



The SGA elections were held March 
25 and 26. With those that were elect- 
ed, there seems to be a new mood on 
campus. A mood that will enable changes 
to be made, even if it means disagree- 
ing with god almighty. The people who 
were elected will hopefully fight harder 
than past officers for what students 
need and want. Many good IDEAS 
were brought out in the campaign, ideas 
that should work, if given the chance. 
If the new officers can prove the ideas 
well-founded the biggest obstacle (we all 
know who he is) should give the stu- 
dents the chance to use their judgement 
on what is best for themselves. 

But the strength of the student body 
is needed. The only way the student 
body can be united is if it is informed 
of SGA and class proceedings. It is the 
responsibility of the officers (SGA and 
class) to enlighten their classmates on 
the problems confronting them, either 
through a newsletter or through the 
school paper. 

So now that the elections are over, 
the back-stabbing and mud-slinging has 
to stop. The only way this school 
can improve is by ALL members of the 
school being informed on what's going 
on, so that the excuse, "I never heard 
of it," will not be heard of again. 



SPINNEY 



COZZOLINO 



CYCLE 



APRIL 14,1971 



EDITORIAL 



THE RECENT ELECTIONS ON THIS CAMPUS SEEMED TO HAVE AWAKENED 
A SLEEPING DRAGON. THE STUDENTS ONCE AGAIN HAVE ARISEN TO HAVE 
THEIR VOICES HEARD AND FELT, BUT THROUGH QUIET TACTICS OF UN- 
KNOWN VALUE HAVE AGAIN BEEN OVERTHROWN. STUDENT'S VOICES HAVE 
BEEN DISCARDED AS IF THEY WERE OUTSIDE AGITATORS INSTEAD OF MEM- 
BERS OF THE COLLEGE COMMUNITY. WHY? WHO IS TO BENEFIT FROM 
THIS SEEMINGLY LOW BLOW TO STUDENT POLITICS ON THIS CAMPUS 
THE REFERENDUMS THAT WERE VOTED UPON HAVE NO MEANING TO OUR 
ADMINISTRATORS. TO QUOTE AN ADMINISTRATORS VIEW il. DURANTE), 
"IT DOESN'T MAKE A DIFFERENCE; THE PRESIDENT STTLL HAS THE LAST 
SAY." THIS TO ME IS BAD POLITICS AND THAT FEELING SHOULD BE THE 
SAME FOR YOU. ARE THE STUDENTS KIDDING THEMSELVES WHEN THEY 
VOTE FOR THEIR LEADERS; DOES THE ADMINISTRATION ALSO HAVE THE 
LAST SAY IN THE TOO? 

THE STUDENTS HAVE SPOKEN AND THEY ALONE HAVE CHOSEN THEIR 
LEADERS, FOR THE STUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION. 

THE QUESTION STEMS OVER THE FACT OF WHO IS THE REAL STUDENT 
GOVERNMENT PRESIDENT; MARK RICE OR MARK MANLEY. ONCE AGAIN 
THE STUDENTS HAVE SPOKEN, THE SGA PRESIDENTELECT ts MARK RICE 
PEOPLE ARE ELECTED BY YOU AND THE SGA. HOWEVER, THE POLITICAL 
AMBITIOUSNESS OF ONE CANDIDATE HAS FORCED HIMSELF TO BELIEVE 
THAT HE B THE ONE TRUE PRESIDENT ELECT OF THE STUDENTS AND 
HE ALONE CAN ACCEPT THE ELECTED OFFICE EVEN THOUGH WE HAVE 
ELECTED HIS OPPOSITION. WHAT HAS HAPPENED HERE IS THE COMPLETE 
USURPING OF STUDENT VOICES AGAIN, THE SAME THING AS BEING OVER- 
THROWN. HARK BUT THIS ISN'T BEING DONE BY HIM ALONE A LITTLE 
HELP FROM WHAT IS CONSIDERED THE INTERMEDIATE PARTY HAS GIVEN 
HIM THIS SUPERFICIAL POWER. WHATISBEING DONE HERE B A COMPLETE 
DISREGARD OF STUDENT VOICE AND RIGHTS NOT ONLY HE, BUT FACTIONS 
OF THE ADMINBTRATION DO NOT RECOGNIZE THE STUDENTS OR PRE- 
MBE OF WHICH THE WHOLE CAMPAIGN WAS RUN UPON STUDENT RIGHTS 
38 PERCENT OF THE STUDENT BODY TURNED OUT FOR THE ELECTION 
PROBABLY THE LARGEST NUMBER IN THE HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 
BUT OF COURSE THAT DOES'NT MEAN ANYTHING EITHER I SUPPOSE* 
HOW CAN HE POSSIBLY CALL HIMSELF AN ADVOCATE OF STUDENT RIGHTS 
WHEN HE CONTINUALLY FIGHTS AGAINST STUDENTS WITH AID OF THE AD- 
MINBTRATION AND GOD KNOWS WHAT OTHER SECRET GOVERNMENTAL 
OFFICE. THE B NOT THE FIRST TIME THAT WE HAVE BEEN OVERTHROWN 
BY THE AMBITIOUS HAND OF POLITICS, THE CASE HAS ALSO ARBEN IN 
THE "CYCLE" BSUE. WE HAVE BEEN OVERTHROWN BEFORE BY THESE 
TWO AGENCIES, WHAT WILL IT BE NEXT 

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE ADMINBTRATION BACKS A: CANDIDATE 
TO RULE THE STUDENTS, E HE SATISFYING THEIR NEEDS OR OURS? WE 
HAVE SPOKEN AND NOW THE ADMINBTRATION THREATENS TO INVALI- 
DATE THE ELECTIONS. WHAT B GOING ON HERE? WHO OR WHAT E THE 
PERSON THAT CAN CAUSE THE ADM1NBTRATI0NS AWAKENING TO STU- 
DENT POLITICAL AFFAIRS. B IT THAT HE AGE B MORE APPEALING TO 
THEIR SOCIAL CLASS? E IT THAT A PERSON THIRTY YEARS OLD HAS 
A RIGHT TO WIN? ORCOULDITBE, JUST MAYBE, THEY ARE AFRAID OF THE 
ELECTED OFFICIALS. ALL THESE QUESTIONS AND MORE COME OUT OF 
THB PAST ELECTION. 

IF THESE ELECTIONS ARE INVALIDATED OR THE PEOPLE ELECT NOT 
RECOGNIZED BY THE ADMINBTRATION, THE STUDENT VOICE ON THB 
CAMPUS B NOTHING MORE THAN A RECORDING THE ADMINBTRATION 
TURNS ON TO FIND OUT WHAT STUDENT'S ARE DOING SATURD4Y NIGHT 
THE PEOPLE HAVE SPOKEN AND IF THE CONTINUAL INFRINGEMENT UPON 
PEOPLES RIGHTS ON THE CAMPUS MOVES ON ONLY THE PEOPLE CAN REC- 




TIFY THE PROBLEM. 



FAREWELL, 

FRANCE SIRAGUSA. 



JAIL IS COMING?... 



Is there a friend you'd like to ar- 
rest? Would you ever fine your buddy 
$5.00 for cutting an 8 o'clock class on 
a Monday morning'? You can do this 
without penalizing him with a court re- 
cord by participating in Fitchburg's 
first Jail Day for Retarded Children. 

How you go about arresting a friend, 
Professor, brother, or employer is sim- 
ple. It involves purchasing a 500 
summons for their arrest in either 
Thomson lobby or in designated stores 
in the Fitchburg area. Just fill out the 
summons with tiie charge andfine of your 
choice and include his name and usual 
location on a typica 1 Thursday. From 
there the Keystone Kops will take over! 

Keystone Kops will look for the guil- 
ty person (anywhere but in a class) 
and take him to 'Jail' in the old paddy 
wagon. There he will appear before a 
judge and if found guilty, but pays his 
fine he will be free from the clink 
and his money will be put to the fund 
for the retarded children in the North 
Worcester area. 

On May 6 - GO TO JAIL FOR RE- 
TARDED CHILDREN 

Summons will be available beginning 
April 26. 

The Jail will be located in the John 
Fitch Plaza Parking Lot, 

Elaine Fennessey 



NEW EDITOR 



The new CYCLE editor for the year 
of "71-72" has been elected and shows 
signs of a changing policy whether 
good or bad can only be assumed by 
you. Karen Gibson elected by a 300 
vote margin over a non running mate 
who grabbed 32 write in votes. 

Much help will be needed by Karen's 
staff especially people who know what 
they are doing. Let's give as much 
help to the student newspaper as possible, 
in such ways as hot tips, or bounding 
information that I received for each 
article. 

The newspaper on any campus holds 
the most power of any organization for 
it has the ruling hand of student feelings 
and information. 



TO THE EDITOH: 

Dear Fellow Student, 

An opportunity is with us again that 
only comes once a year, A new Stu- 
dent Government has just been elected. 
What mates this an opportunity is* that 
on each facet of Student Government^ 
a committee will be formed. Financial, 
Educational, Social, Cultural, and more. 
For each goal, a group of students is 
needed to plan and develop the way to 
accomplish it. Students, fresh and ready 
for a year of representing us, the stu- 
dent body, are looking for .your needs 
and ideas, . 

Through this paper, please tell the stu- 
dent body that although elections are 
over, the work just begins. If they want, 
then, they must ask. K they want action, 
then they can volunteer, because the 
best way to get action is to help. It's 
important to staff the many and varied 
committees. It's important to get these 
things done. It's for us. 

Thank You, 
MarkC.L. Manley 



TO THE EDITOR: 

FROM; Jo Helander, chairman Cultural 
Events '71 -'72 

Patsy Townsend, co-chairman Cul- 
tural Events '71-*72 Each year the 
C.E. Committee tries to get a poll as 
to student feeling on what they'd like 
to see brought to the campus by C.E, 
Each yearwegetnoreply.EacnyearcX 
ends up making the decisions as to 
what comes as events. And each year 
the students bitch about what comes. 
Does that make any sense to you? It 
doesn't to us. Therefore we are giving 
you another chance - What would you 
like to see at FSC? What speakers? 
What topics? What kinds of movies? 
Any particular movies? What kinds of 
theatre? Modern? Opera? Ballet? Mu- 
sicals? Concerts? Classical? Folk? Just 
exactly what kinds of events do you 
want? No one on the C.E. Committee 
is a mind reader. So, we have the fol- 
lowing proposal for you— IF YOU DON'T 
REPLY, YOU DON'T BITCH. Fair is 
fair. Please put your suggestions in 
the campus mailbox addressed to either: 
Jo Helander Box 470 or Patsy Town- 
send Box N905 

Thanks 



Drugs. 

If you've got 
questions 
we've got 
answers. 



Questions oik..-,i by people like you jre 
jnmried in Ihe Federal sourcebook : "Answers 
lo the mo,t IreqoHnlly .uked queHions about 

For your free copy send in Ihe coupon 









, Wnhnno, 


Demon 


A*J'K, 


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. TO THE EDITOR: 

Dear J.C.: 

Since I am the only "older" person 
named Frank who supported Peace Now, 
at FSC last year, I assume your letter, 
"Dear Frank" is addresed to me. 

You wrote, "People are more careful 
this year as to what activities they sup- 
port. To some repression is around the 
corner,,.. It smacks of a new McCar- 
thy era to older people," 

J.C., whoever you are, you write 
with a profound lack of knowledge con- 
cerning someone else's motivations. My 
motives for failing to participate in this 
year's activities concern the utter fu- 
tility of last year's activities: a tre- 
mendous march on Washington foiled 
by Nixon watching T.V.; demonstrations 
in New York resulting in hard-hat 
aggression being rewarded by hard- 
hat invitations to the White House: 
Agnew's abuse of dissenters; his total 
failure to communicate with students on 
a television discussion program; his 
attitude toward the peace people con- 
vinces me that the administration isn't 
listening. One might as well talk to the 
. Lincoln Memorial, 

Last year we went into Cambodia, 
We screamed "bloody murder". This 
year we hit Laos and are, at this 
writing, re-hitting Laos. What affect 
did last year's activities have on 
Dick and Spiro? The only hope I 
have is for 1972. Hopefully the mass 
media, which are doing a good job, and 
the lower voting age will shake things 
"P. 

As to the lack of courage implied by 
the above quoted statement, anyone who 
knows me knows that I am quite out- 
spoken and not subject to coercion, no 
matter what the cost. 

I think, J.C., that you have become a 
victim of J, Edgar's avowed purpose of 
"enhancing" paranoia on campus. You 
talk of repression being around the 
corner and a new McCarthy era. You 
must be "putting on" the CYCLE rea- 
dership.. Repression isn't around the 
corner; it's here. 

We know the situation is bad, but we 
must not become paranoid about it to 
the extent of questioning the motives 
of others of good will. 

As to comparing the McCarthy era 
to the present political situation, Mc- 
Carthy was only one man. Surely you 
must have read and/ or heard of the 
recent massive assult on the American 
people by numerous governmental agen- 
cies. McCarthy was a Rover Boy com- 
pared to the present systematized, com- 
puterized governmental effort. If this 
were not so, why would I be so lacking 
in courage as to write this signed 
response? 

Peace and Love, 
Frank Wolf 
Professor of Biology 




gtarUi 
renaissance, 






APRIL 14,1971 



CYCLE 



STUDENT POWER and S.G.A. 1971 1972 



Student power to some sounds harsh and revolutionary, to me it is a form of 
democracy, an idea that the United States and its people have placed their trust 
and hopes in for almost 300 years. It is basically students receiving the rights 
that they deserve. It is the right of self -governance, the same right that so many 
men died for during the American Revolution. We can no longer be told that we 
are too young or immature to govern ourselves. If we are the Senate and Con- 
gress of the United States has made a terrible mistake in giving us the right to 
elect the men who do such things as, declare war and spend over a billion dol- 
lar a year, do not think. 

With these ideas in mind, the S.G.A. executive board elected by popular vote, 
is demanding that students receive the rightsguarantee by the Constitution of 
the United States. Some of them are: the right to elect our own representative 
(without outside influence), the right to a trial by jury (if an -offense is committed 
a STUDENT jury will decide the innocent or guilt not one or two men) and the 
right to be taxed only thru representation (student activity fee spent by students). 

Students only, should have the right to spend their money as they see fit. 
By State Law, President Hammond is responsible for the spending of the student 
activity fee. This is wrong. S.G.A. should be totally responsible, and this, I 
believe, will come about when S.G.A. becomes incorporated, that is a legal 
body in the eyes of the law. For the moment I say to President Hammond, "trust 
us, let us set up our budget completely, and if anything should happen, we will 
demand that we be held responsible and support you fully should you encounter 
any difficulty. 

What has been said thus far, concerns what the council will gain by student 
power. What you as students will receive is far more important. You will in 
general receive more respect, more responsibility and more freedom. A few of 
the specific rights you will gain are the following; the right to set up the rules 
and regulations that you will live by (residents of the Dorm), the right to de- 
cide under which system you will be graded, the right to unbaised grading, the 
right to openly evaluate a course and instructor, the right to due process of 
the law, the right to decide whether to drop a course or not, and the right to 
decide how your activity fee will be spent, etc. etc. 

To gain this power two things are necessary. 1) a hard working council 
and executive board, that will not hesitate to put the goals of S.G.A. above every- 
thing and 2) your support, help, and encouragement when the going gets rough. 
With these and a little luck we will be able to accomplish our goals and in turn 
give you, the students, the rights and benefits you deserve. 
Bob O'Reilley 

S.G.A. Treasurer 

THE LIBERATED COED 



Women's liberation implies the 
freedom of every woman to choose the 
lifestyle which is the most fulfilling for 
her, regardless of any preconceived no- 
tions of sexual roles. Such liberation 
is often a farce on this campus. 

Many FSC coeds are foolishly al- 
lowing their college experience, possibly 
the most potentially liberating of their 
lives, to confine them in a set role 
for four years. While competing equal- 
ly on an academic level through work 
in a field of their choice, the FSC 
coed has settled for a degrading non- 
academic role on campus. Freedom has 
been doled out to her in carefully le- 
velled portions under the watchful eye 
of the Administration. They've removed 
her curfew and given her parietals, but 
in such a way that discrimination can't 
be overlooked. The FSC coed has, in 
the past, been forced to plead for rights 
and privileges which have been given to 
male students unquestionably. Obvious- 
ly, the Administration feels that the 
FSC coed is less able to cope with free- 
dom and responsibility than her male 
counterpart. 

Also, handicapped by the unnatural 
sex ratio, the FSC coed is conditioned 
to assume a very passive social role. 
What choice does she have, but to fall 
within the present social system where 
she must often suppress her individua- 
lity in order to be socially accepted? 
Is a girl at FSC asking too much if 
she wants to be thought of as more 
than just a "good make" for the week- 
end? Doesn't a guy want to be judged 
on more than the color of his jacket? 
Can't a guy understand that the free- 
dom to act independently that he values 
so highly is equally important to a 
girl? I wonder 



NEW CENTER 



The new center has certainly been an 
asset to activities and the old center 
has been converted into study facilities. 
Both houses are open Monday through 
Thursday 10:00 a.m, to 10:00 p.m. and 
on Friday 10:00 a.m, to 3:00 p.m. 
Saturday mass is at 4:30 p.m, and 
Sunday mass Is still at 11:00. 

Amorig the activities for the rest of 
the semester was a Coffeehouse on 
March 21 at the new center. It featured 
an invited duet from Worcester, Goin' 
Fission, 

One of the biggest events will be the 
raffle. Tickets will soon be on sale 
for prizes (tentitive): 
first: $100.00 
second: $50.00 
-third: $10.00 (three third prizes) 

Tickets will be §1.00 each and $5.00 
for a book of six. The drawing will 
take place at the Spaghetti Dinner on 
May 1. 

Newman is trying to help in the 
central Massachusetts drive for General 
Mills and Betty Crocker coupons in 
hopes of purchasing the dialysis ma- 
chine for the Worcester area. Anyone 
who can help, please bring coupons to the 
center. 

Elections for next years' officers 
will be during April, pnly paid mem- 
bers will be allowed to vote. 



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(WHEN I GROW UP) 

How sad and odd it all seems some- 
times. The wish to attain knowledge 
and understanding of the problems. Oh 
you, so educated, so aware; but often 
so cold. There's a feeling of strange- 
ness and meaninglessness that seems to 
affect so many of us. 

What's the matter? 

We come here for four years; each 
with an idea of what reality is. For 
some it's a constant party, for others 
it's long hours of study, but for most 
it's a period of waiting. The waiting 
means believing that life begins at 21, 
with graduation. A teleological idea 
that the end is the means. That summer 
day in June of a fourth yewr, some- 
how signals the beginning of life (sounds 
like an old valedictory speech doesn't 
it?) "On that day you shall become 
responsible" as though all that goes on 
beforehand is utter nonsense. 

However, for many ( or it is just 
YOU, AD everyting is nonsense and the 
future comes only with economic se- 
curity and only after the life's work 
is begun. 

I really think this is the reason why 
so many are unhappy; it's just too 
hard to wait for life. 

Al Niemi 



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A nation wide student strike has been called May 5, 1971, in support of the 
end the war policy and the piling no. of infractions that the Nixon administra- 
tion has committed against the American people during it's reign. It is also a 
good chance to get what we want out of the school administration. 



CYCLE 



APRIL 14,1971 



THE WAR 



CALL FOR ACTION 



APRIL 1-9 



NO PROTEST ON LAOS 



The outcome of the invasion of Laos 
by South Vietnamese troops is still in 
doubt Yet the outcome of this ope- 
ration will have significant influence 
on the duration of American involve- 
ment in the war. 

American students, including USC stu- 
dents, have in the past been vocal, 
and sometimes violent, in expressing 
their opposition to American moves 
that to them signal continued American 
participation and escalation of the In- 
dochina conflict. Yet, unlike the Cam- 
bodian invasion last May which resulted 
in massive strikes on American cam- 
puses the Laotian invasion has stirred 
little protest from the students. 

At USC while individuals may ex- 
press opinions there has been no uni- 
fied action of protest. Leaders of last 
May's strike attempted to rally sup- 
port for a protest march over the week- 
end but failed to generate any signi- 
ficant student response. 

While perhaps a majority of students 
may disagree with this extension of the 
war, an observer of campus events 
would have no reason to believe that 
they did. The last five years have been 
a time of large protest, and last May 
saw the largest number of students par- 
ticipating in protest. Why then, have the 
campuses been quiet on the Laotian in- 
vasion? 

The reasons are complex, but there 
are reasons. President Nixon did not 
build up the invasion of Laos, as he 
did with the Cambodian invasion and 
thus, protest would not be as great. 
No U.S. ground combat troops are 
involved with the invasion as they were 
in the Cambodian invasion. U.S. par- 
ticipation does not seem as great. The 
Laotian invasion is a South Vietnamese 
action, despite the fact that the opera- 
tion was planned and approved by Pre- 
sident Nixon. 

Student leaders, particularly those at 
USC, have lost the support of the mass 
of students, and they realize it. Too 
many students recognize that their goals 
at the universities are not mass pro- 
tests against the war. Students also, 
seem to believe that President Nixon's 
plans of Vietnamizing the war are lead- 
ing to decreased American troop par- 
ticipation. Few students buy the theory 
of American aggresion and imperialism 
espoused by campus militants. 

The Laotian invasion is vital to 
Nixon's plans for American withdrawal. 
If the South Vietnamese can keep the 
Ho Chi Minn trails blocked and keep 
supplies from reaching the enemy troops 
in C ambodia and South Vietnam, the Ame- 
rican withdrawal timetable can be met 
and the forces of Cambodia and South 
Vietnam can be built up to a level 
capable of withstanding future enemy of- 
fensives. 

But if the invasion fails, the war 
could continue much as it has. North 
Vietnam could choose to step up support 
for guerrillas in Thailand or step up 
its own military effort in central Laos. 
Or the Northcould strike directly against 
the forces of the South in Laos. Any 
of those actions might necessitate even 
further American involvement and indi- 
cate a failure of Nixon's famous plan 
to win the war. 

The war must end. Nixon's policies. 
If the South Vietnamese succeed in Laos] 
seem tobe decreasing American involve- 
ment in the war. Nixon's policies seem 
to be the best means of ending the war, 
aside from a negotiated political settle- 
ment, which seems an impossibility, 
judging from the peace talks. Unilateral 
withdrawal would be a disaster, as great 
a disaster as trying to win the war 
militarily. American students realize 
these things, and are no longer protest- 



SELECTIVE SERVICE 
RELEASE 



The Selective Service System today 
announced a new policy that closes two 
loopholes in draft regulations used by 
draft resistors and at the same time 
makes it easier for young men to be 
inducted in any part of the country, 
regardless of the location of their local 
boards. 

A Presidential Executive Order, pu- 
blished today in the Federal Register, 
authorizes any called registrant to be 
voluntarily inducted at any ArmedForces 
entrance and Examining Station 
(AFEES), provided that he reports to the 
AFEES prior to his scheduled date of 
induction, and after he has received 
his induction order. 

The new policy removes the restriction 
that formerly required "hardship" or 
"good reason" to support a request for 
transfer and eliminates the adminis- 
trative requirement for a delay in in- 
duction for those registrants who have 
moved to new locations. 

The new regulation further provide that 
if the registrant does not submit for 
induction three or more days prior to 
his scheduled date, he must report on 
the date originally indicated to the site 
specified on his induction order. This 
means that men who choose to refuse 
induction will be referred for prosecu- 
tion in the judicial districts which ser- 
vice the areas of their local boards. 
Implementing instructions to local 
boards on the new regulations will be 
issued shortly, Selective Service 
officials said, 

"The result of this change in re- 
gulations," remarked Selective Service 
Director Curtis W, Tarr, "is that men 
requesting transfers in good faith will 
not be denied this opportunity — in fact, 
they will have their rights to transfer 
broadened." He continued, "On the 
other hand, registrants who seek trans- 
fers only for purposes of delaying 
induction or facing draft law violation 
charges in a different jurisdiction will 
find these loopholes closed." 

Selective Service officials said that 
the new regulation will not affect any 
cases now before the courts, or cases 
where violations have already occurred. 



SHOULD THE PROPOSED 



DEFENSE BUDGET 
BE APPROVED? 

Last Thursday, four members of the 
Debate Club, Karen Lasson, Debbie 
Cross, Ken Goss, and Jerry Etheridge, 
along with Mrs. Michael Blowen, attend- 
ed the taping of "THE ADVOCATES", 
a weekly television program which regu- 
larly schedules debates on timely and 
controversial topics. On March 18, 
the matter in question was whether or 
not the proposed defense budget should 
be approved. Many good points were 
brought out on both sides: Mr. Rusher 
on the affirmative side, stated that he 
thought the budget was essential for se- 
curity and defense within the U.S.; Mr. 
Miller on the negative side, claimed that 
we already have enough security, that 
much of the defense money is wasted, 
and that the money should be spent 
elsewhere, for schools, hospitals, and 
other civic needs. Both sides presented 
knowledgeable witnesses which brought 
out new perspectives on the topic. 

The Debate Club found the program 
very interesting and informative. Any- 
one interested in this current topic 
should watch"THE ADVOCATES" Tues- 
day night, March 30, at 9:00 p.m. on 
Channel 2. 

Deb Cross 



For the first time in the history of 
the movement, national third world or- 
ganizations are joining with the anti- 
war movement in conducting the spring 
offensive for peace and justice. 

At this moment the National Welfare 
Rights Organization headed by Dr. 
George Wiley, and the Southern Chris- 
tian Leadership Conference directed by 
Dr. Ralph Abernathy, are bringing their 
constituencies into this spring's activi- 
ties. The decision to do so is based on 
the agreement of large segments of the 
peace movement to respect on a parity 
the questions of social justice and peace. 
These questions represent themselves in 
the 3 demands of: 

1. Immediate total withdrawal from 
Vietnam by a set date, 

2. $6,500 minimum annual income 
for a family of four. 

3. Free all political prisoners. 

Mayday Movement calls for mass sup- 
port for these actions: 

April 1-4: TRIBUTE IN ACTION TO 
MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. -Support 
for SCLC- WRO call for action on 
the theme: "Freedom from hunger, war 
and repression." Focus onSCLC-NWRO 
demonstration on Wall Street. Nation- 
wide local activities such as: Hunger 
marches to dramatize hunger for jobs, 



housing and peace; Fasts; Teach-ins and 
other special programs in schools on 
April 2; Tax Protest and Resistance ac- 
tivities on a community level relating 
to reordering priorities; Rallies on April 
3; Religious Tributes to Martin Luther 
King on Sunday April 4. People will 
beurged to live on Welfare food budget 
the week of March 28 to April 3. Lo- 
cal WRO'S will sponsor welfare din- 
ners April 4. (Money collected from 
Hunger Marches, Fasts, and Rallies will 
be sent to National Welfare Right's 
Organization, 1419 H. St, N.W., Washing- 
ton, D.C. 20005). 

April 5-9 NEW YORK CITY. SCLC 
AND PEOPLE'S COALITION. Demons- 
trations, including militant non-violent 
civil disobedience at Wall Street to 
dramatize demands of America's poor. 

We cannot stress enought need for 
everyone to support and involve them- 
selves in the early April actions. We 
will suffer from our inability to reach 
out to other oppressed human beings 
if this period goes by without our per- 
sonal involvement. 

MAYDAY TRIBE 

1029 Vermont Ave. N.W. 
Room 906 
Washington, D.C. 20005 



KENT STATE STUDENT 
FACE FLAG DESECRATION CHARGES 



KENT, Ohio (CPS) — Three more stu- 
dents at Kent State University face 
charges in anti-war protests, this time 
for "flag desecration." 

Indictments handed down last week 
charge three students, one of them a 
Student Court Justice , with violating a 
state flag desecration law. During the 
Feb. 4 incident, a large crowd of de- 
monstrators lowered the U.S. flag and 
raised a Vietnamese National Liberation 
Front flag. They were protesting the 
invasion of Laos, and did not damage 
the U.S. flag. 

Meanwhile, the U.S. Attorney is ap- 
pealing a Federal District Court de- 



cision of last fall which dismissed the 
findings of the Federal Grand Jury in- 
vestigating the May, 1970, demonstra- 
tions at Kent State. However, because 
the District Court did not dismiss the 
25 indictments still pending against stu- 
dents andfacultyforfederalriotcharges, 
Kent legal sources are hoping that the 
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will not 
only rule against the U.S. Attorney's 
appeal, but will also dismiss the indict- 
ments. 

No National Guardsmen or state au- 
thorities were indicted in the original 
Grand Jury findings, and at this time 
no new Jury has been called. 




GtTQilTOF 
Laos 



j 




APRIL 14,1971 



CYCLE 



SPRING CONFERENCE 



ON THE EXECPTIONAL CHILD 



A Spring Conference on the Except- 
ional Child was held at Weston Audi- 
torium on Saturday, March 27, 1971. 
This annual Conference was again held 
this year at Pitchburg State, which now 
has the largest undergraduate program in 
Special Education in the Eastern United 
States. The past year has also seen the 
addition of laboratory classrooms in spe- 
cial education at the McKay Campus 
School and the continual growth, sup- 
ported by Federal funding, of the re- 
sources and materials in the special 
education area. 

Students and staff in the Department 
of Special Education use the conference 
as a unit of study. Initial planning 
starts a year in advance of the con- 
ference date. Emphasis is given to the 
theme, type of program, needs of the 
community, current trends, availability 
of resources and evaluations by parti- 
cipants in previous conferences. Com- 
mittees are formed to identify objectives, 
develop procedures and encourage in- 
novation and responsibility. Some of the 
committees are: hosts and hostesses, 
publicity, registration, mailing, video- 
tape, displays, refreshments, physical 
arrangements, decorations, and clean- 
up. Students act as chairmen of the 
workship committees and learn how to 
introduce speakers and conduct se- 
minars. Peer group evaluation and co- 
operation are continuously encouraged. 
This year's conference dealt with 
five areas of exceptionality: the train- 
able mentally retarded, the educable 
mentally retarded, the emotionally dis- 
turbed, the learning disabled, and the 
multiple -handicapped. The national 
speakers who were addressing them- 
selves to these areas were: Dr. L, 
Ignacy Goldberg, Professor of Education, 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 
New York; Dr. John Eichorn, Coordi- 
nator of Special Education and Rehabi- 
litation, Boston College; Dr. Gabriel 
Simches, Consultant, State Department 
of Special Education, Hartford, Connec- 
ticut; Dr. Max Subrow, Director, 
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston. 
The reactors were: Dr. Agisilaos J. 
Pappanikou, Chairman of SpecialEduca- 
tion, University of Connecticut, Storrs, 
Connecticut; Dr. Arnold Fassler, Chair- 
man of Special Education, SouthernCon- 
necticut State College, North Haven, Con- 
necticut; Mr. Ross E. Fearon, Director 
of Special Education, Farmington Maine 
State College; Mr. Manfred Drewski, 
Consultant, State Department of Edu- 
cation, Concord, New Hampshire; Dr. 
Donald Maietta, Associate Professor of 
Education, Boston University. 

Neighborhood colleges heard about this 
program and requested their staff mem- 
bers to contact the Department of Spe- 
cial Education at Fitchburg State Col- 
lege so they became actively involved 
in this conference. Some of these col- 
leges were Bridgewater State College, 
Westfield State College, University of 
Massachusetts, Boston University, 
Boston University, Boston College, Anna 
Maria College, Keene State College, Uni- 
versity of Maine and University of Conn- 
ecticut. 

The theme of this year's conference 
was to encourage active audience par- 
ticipation by raising many issues and 

TO ALL COLLEGE 
FACULTY 

Please announce to your classes that 
the Department of History and Geogra- 
phy will begin to receive Papers for 
consideration in the Roger F. Holmes 
Award on April 1, 1971. The contest 
will remain open until May 3. 1971. 
The Award this year will be $50.00; 
Details as to requirements of the papers 
submitted may be had by checking with 
the History office, the Peridicald De- 
partment at the College Library or the 
copy of Requirements posted on the 
Bulletin Board. 

Thank You, 
Dept. of History and Geography. 



suggesting tentative solutions. Some of 
the members of the audience came from 
the states of New Hampshire, Maine, 
Vermont, Connecticut, New York, and 
Massachusetts. The audience was a 
cross-section of a typical community 
and included people from the profes- 
sional world such as teachers, guidance 
personnel, psychologists, mental health 
workers, parents and students. 



Students from more than adozenMon- 
tachusett area junior and senior high 
schools participated in the First Annual 
Science Symposium on Monday, March 
22, 1971, sponsored by Fitchburg State 
College and the Alice G. Wallace Plane- 
tarium. The purpose of theScienceSym- 
posium was to stimulate a greater in- 
terest in science education and scien- 
tific research and to give outstanding 
science students an opportunity to share 
their experiences with area students and 
teachers. The day-long event featured 
research papers presented by science 
students dealing with specialized topics 
in biology, chemistry, geology, astrono- 
my and mathematics. Dr. Robert 
Zottoli, biologist at Fitchburg State Col- 
lege, was the principal speaker during 
the morning session and presented an 
illustrated talk on his recent research 
in marine biology conducted in Puerto 
Rico. 

A science achievement test was given 
to nearly one hundred participating 
students and prizes were awarded to 
the top finishers from grades se- 
ven through twelve. Prizes were also 
awarked to all students presenting re- 
search papers in recognition of their 
contribution to the Symposium. The 
prizes were donated by the AliceG. Wal- 
lace Planetarium, national science 
equipment firms and book publishers 
and included binoculars, pollution ana- 
lysis equipment, a slide rule, reference 
books and other science materials. 

Dinner was served in theGalaxyRoom 
of the Alice G. Wallace Planetarium 
and was followed by a special Plane- 
tarium presentation prepared by Mr. 
Russell Blake, Planetarium Director. 
The Science Symposium, the first of 
its kind in central Massachusetts, was 
conducted through the cooperation of 
Fitchburg State College and the Alice 
G. Wallace Planetarium and was under 
the direction of Clinical Professor Dr. 
Donald J. Schmidt and Science Super- 
visors Harold F. Desmond, Jr., and Ri- 
chard H. Maki of the McKay Campus 
School. The ScienceSymposiumreceived 
invaluable assistance from the college 
Biology Club and the assistant teachers 
in the Science Department at the Mc- 
Kay Campus School. 



The German Department at Fitchburg 
State College played host on Saturday, 
March 20, 1971 to over thirty high 
school scholars of German who were 
competing in the A ATGC American Asso- 
ciation of Teachers of German) Contest. 

Students came from surrounding high 
schools in Fithcubrg, Gardner, and 
Northboro. The contest is national in 
scope and the winners receive a free 
trip to Germany. 




TRAVELINS 



It is estimated that 175,000 American 
students will travel, study or work in 
Europe during the summer of 1971. 
One organization promoting study, work- 
ing and touring programs, is American 
Students Association, a student associa- 
tion with over 15,000 members. ASA 
is represented by correspondents and 
members in over 850 colleges and uni- 
versities throughout the U.S. 

ASA offers information and booklets 
covering working and touring abroad, 
and on the multiplicity of study programs, 
scholarships and grants which are open 
to U.S. students. You may become a 
member of ASA by sending three dol- 
lars to ASA, Box 36087, Cincinnati, 
Ohio 45236. 

Work opportunities for American stu- 
dents in Europe during the summer have 
increased due to the fact that European 
countries in the Common Market are 
at the present time in a period of 
massive production expansion and are 
short of having a full labor force. Work- 
ing abroad gives serious students the 
opportunity to acquire first handfamila- 
rity with European life and to improve 
their knowledge of the European 
languages. American Students Associa- 
tion is in contact with European firms 
and arranges for employment of Ame- 
rican Students in Europe. 

Jobs are available in skilled and un- 
skilled areas in hotels, hospitals, and 
summer camps in Switzerland, Ger- 
many, Austria and England. There is a 
placement charge ($35.00), which is re- 
funded by ASA if they are unable to 
obtain a job for you. ASA offers "Stu- 
dent Europe" ($1.95), also, "Hiking 
Europe" ($1.00), which gives all sorts 
of information on small inexpensive res- 
taurants, good touring routes and tips 
on how to hitch - hike. American Stu- 
dents can indulge in hitchiking in Eu- 
rope, which is even cheaper than taking 
the third class coach, and not nearly 
so wearisome as plain hiking. 

ASA furnishes round - trip air trans- 
portation to its members at greatly re- 
duced rates. 

Information can be obtained by writing 
to: American Students Association, 
P.O. Box 36087, Cincinnati, Ohio. 45236. 



THE CONDITION 
WE*RE IN 



When speaking of the ailment causing 
the most serious internal damage at 
Fitchburg State, apathy is inevitably 
mentioned. It would seem that it's 
become second nature to the majority 
of students to wearily cite indifference 
as the virus that's incapacitating other- 
wise healthy people who would normally 
have contributions to make to the col- 
lege community. It would also 
seem that the students are cor- 
rect in their diagnosis of the illness, 
for apparently there has been a total 
disintegration of the vital, unifyingforce 
the campus needs to recuperatefromthe 
stupor into which it has fallen. Oc- 
casionally a flicker of health enables 
the afflicted to rally enough strength 
to fight against the insiduous creeping 
of the disease, but the periods of well- 
being are brief and always followed by 
a relapse which plunges thecampusback 
onto the critical list. Those who are 
concerned about the condition of the 
school have not yet given up hope or de- 
veloped a fatalistic attitude toward the 
future, however, as the doctors in the 
Science building—after researching a 
similar case of last spring— have dis - 
covered a miracle cure. The treat- 
ment itself is deceptively simple, and 
has been compared to the electric shock 
method of reviving heart attack victims. 
In order to put the patient on the road 
to rapid recovery, the head surgeon has 
decided to ignore the results of the re- 
cent SGA election in order to investi- 
gate the validity of the students' choice 
of president. While this course of 
action has its critics, it is evident 
that it will bring about the desired 
results. An acknowledgement should 
be made of the surgeon's shrewdness 
in recognizing that nothing can revive 
a failing patient like denying him the 
right to decide who is to preside over 
an organization designed to serve him. 
It is obvious that this is the shot in 
the arm that is needed to effectively 
stop the malignancy of apathy by re- 
placing it with a concerned student 
body, striving for health through united 
action. 



JOIN THE 
MARCH ON WASHINGTON 



PRIL 






-CALENDAR OF SPRING ANTIWAR EVENTS- 

All activities of llw National Ptmv Action Coalition are planned 
as legal, peaceful antl orderly manifestations of opposition to the war. 



APRIL 2-4 

—Local dMontfra- 
tlons to mttk the 
{assassination of Mar- 
tin Lulhei King, Jr., 
who among his many 
contributions to tha 
causa at social jus- 
Ilea, ardently op. 
possd tha Vlatnin 
War. 



APRIL 24 

— Man march on 
Washington, D.C. and 
San Francisco In sup- 
port of the demand for 
Immediate withdrawal 
of all U.S. forces from 
Southeast Asia and the 
abolition of the draft. 



MAY 5 

—Antiwar damon- 
stiatloni an east- 
awas and la c«w- 
monillas aroMrf the 
country It ooiumm- 
oratt the antacft 
•f slafcats at Kmt 
Stata ana Jatftus 
Start ass tha 
nationwide outcry 
against tat Imruiat 
of Ci aboil*. 



MAY 16 

(»«1<£0 F0»<!! 

pni-tMbH « 

•It. tub MMlltl 

0>r .113 ulki 
«t »r (Milaf tta 
ill Htt) Icllvll! 
It nflHlfT blM* 



S=3 



CYCLE 



APRIL 14,1971 



ROGER F. HOLMES AWARD 



POETIC NICHE 



DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND GEOGRAPHY 



X. Nature of the Holmes Award and General Conditions. 

The Department of History and Georgraphy of Fitchburg State College, with 
the Cooperation of the college community and the greater community of which 
it is a part, have created the Roger F. Holmes Fund. The purpose of the Fund 
is dual: to perpetuate the memory of Professor Holmes whose long years of 
service to the Department , to the college and the whole community well earned 
such a memorial; to encourage excellence in historical scholarship. 

The motion creating the Fund established the following conditions: 

1. That an award in cash be paid out of the interest annually accumulated 
on the principal of the Fund. 

2. That the award be made only when an amount adequate to encourage com- 
petition is available. 

3. That the award be paid to the best paper in the historyiographic mode 
submitted by a senior of the college to the contest. 

4. That the judgement of the Department of History and Geography as to 
what is the best paper shall be final. 

5. That the Award shall be made at the annual Class Day exercises. 

The Department of History and Geography agrees to the following implications 
of the Holmes Fund Award contest conditions: 

1. Since the purpose of the Fund is recognition and encouragement of ex- 
cellence, the Department reserves the right to withhold the Award when 
no paper submitted for consideration measures up to standards worthy of 
recognition. 

2. The Department agrees that the contest is open to all undergraduate 
seniors regardless of major. The senior status requirement is deter- 
mined in accordance with the records of the Registrar's office. 

3. The subject matter of the papers submitted is limited only by the re- 
quirement that the relate to the human experience and that they be deve- 
loped in accordance with the historical method. 

4. Obviously plaigarism will be sufficient grounds for non-consideration. 
It is expected that the normal amount of direction usually provided by a 
professor to a student in preparing a term paper will obtain in this 
competition. 

5. If the traditional graduation exercises are not open to award-making ce- 
remonies, the Department shall make the Award, publish the winner's 
name, under such circumstances as it deems best. 

II. Specific Requirements for Papers Submitted in Contest. 



1. 



Whatever the area, topic, or subject developed by the paper, the approach 
must be more than antiquarian; the paper must clearly state a thesis 
and, within the limitations of an undergraduate paper, prove it. 
All standards for good English exposition apply. 

Form and style for citations and bibliography shall follow the standard 
of Wood Gray ET ALI, HISTORIANS HANDBOOK, 2nd Edition, Boston- 
Houghton Mifflin, 1965. 

Papers shall be typed double-space in standard type on heavy white paper 
in black ink. 

Papers submitted must employ a title page per the appended example 
In place of the name of the author a number assigned by the Chairman of the 
Department of History and Georgraphy shall be used. 

The paper presented shall include the following parts: Title page Topic 
outline, List of Illustrations Of anyused),Textand Bibliography Footnotes 
must be typed at the bottom of the relevant page within the margins- 
pagination must recognize the distinction between preliminary material 
and textual development. 

The paper shall be at minimum 2500 words in length (12 pages),- at maxi- 
mum 6,000 words (25 pages). *"»'•.■> "■«» 

Papers previously submitted as part of required course work are accept- 
able but only clean original copies will be considered 

The award-winning paper becomes the property of the Department for 
inclusion in a projected compilation of Holmes Fund Award Papers 



WANTED ! ! ! 

DESERVING RECIPIENT FOR A $200 ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP. 
QUALIFICATIONS: 

1. NEED 

2. SCHOLASTIC STANDING 

3. TWO LETTERS OF RECOMMENDATION. 

DEADLINE FOR COMPLETED APPLICATIONS: 

MAY 3RD 

RETURN TO: 

ALUMNI OFFICE OR 

FACULTY MAILBOX* 68 



IMAGE 

mirrors 

deep glass caverns 
thoughts projected 
like rainbows in the skyways 
visible 

yet transparent 
like clouds 
floating with the wind 
high 

where only enlightened mortals 
question their worth, 
or praise their value, 
wispy cobwebs 
like ghosts in the wind 
(like ghosts in the mind) 
blending, 
in a storm. 

Jack Ready 



A LIFE IN A SUMMERHTLL DAY 

"There is a nice chap here called Neill. 
I like him,*' 
SUMMERHILL. 

You're more than a book, you know. 
You're honesty. 

There's no need to cheat, is there? 
You're togetherness 
Wot intellectual isolation. 
You're freedom. 
And that means growth. 
You're creation for the soul. 
(Such ecstacyl) 

You're A.S. Neill and Friends, 
A School of becoming, 
experiencing; 
And self-government. 
Most important, I think, 
You're one with life 

And that's what education's all about. 
Millennium VII 



A PLEA TO COMPUTER 111 

You cramp my surging style 
Whatever it is 

By putting me into somt National Col- 
lege English Association's Style. 
Which is proper and precise. 
You give me a thousand rules to follow 
for a three-page theme 
And then tell me my stereotyped paper is 
lacking. 

You ought to like it.,,. 
It's more you than me. 
I want to say somethingl 
Don't trap me within sterile essays 
Hear mel 

At least 
listen, 
I've got something to say to you 
hi hope that you'll see it's rightfor them. 
When it comes I con't even know it did. 
You will , though, 

Inspiration is something you know of. 
Millennium VII 



GENESIS 

In the surge of an oscillating ecstacy 
I fondle the dream in the mind of the wind. 
Truth 

In my soul.. .halfway 
Misting in and out. 
Leave me hear! 
(I'm not yet there). 
I want to remain 

Oosing through the protoplasm at time. 
Perplexed by everything 
And in search of the answer 
To myself, at least. 
And when the flow of bliss ebbs, 
I'll be one with the leaves and the sky 
Majestically blending into a dying sun 
Or a moan just becoming. 
Millennium VII 



Anyone disobeying 
these laws will be 
imprisoned, fined, 
and/or whipped: 



No u-hitc person mav have sexual 
relations with an African. Cohurcd or 
Indian person And vice versa 

No African may amnd a birthday 
pany if the number attending could 
make the gathering undesirable. 

An African in an urban ana who i*- cur 
of work muM lake work offered to him 
by ihc Bantu Affairs < ommisMoner or be 
removed from ihc area 

No Afruan rrnv hu\ land, or own 
properly, anywhere in the Republic 

I'nder no circumstance', may j non- 
while person use facihuc. set aviJe for 
the use of white per* ms 

So white man mav teach an African 
servant to read 



By order of the South 

African Ministry of Justice.' 



APRIL 14,1971 



CYCLE 



HOMOSEXUAL MILITANCE 



THE YOUNG LIONS? 



To many people, the recent demon- 
strations and confrontations concern- 
ing homosexuals' civilrightsmightseem 
to be just another of those liberation 
movements which are so popular atpre- 
sent. There may be a minor element 
of truth in this view, but the gay li- 
beration movement is primarily con- 
cerned with profound issues-a few of 
which will be mentioned here-involving 
the very basis of man's psychological 
and physical relationship to man. 

Cutting through the ancient rhetoric 
of antihomosexual militants, who have 
existed infinitely longer than the homo- 
sexual militants, one discovers the 
sources of all prejudice against us, our 
difference and our refusal to conform. 
An elaborate structure has been built 
upon this untenable foundation to jus- 
tify centuries of polemics, purges, 
and "scapegoatism," but science and 
truth are now exposing it as fallacious. 
Fallacy I - Homosexuality is Unnat- 
ural. The pitfalls in defining varying 
forms of behavior as "natural" and 
"unnatural" are obvious. What is nat- 
ural at one time and in one plase is 
unnatural at another time and in an- 
other place, i.e„ polygamy, human 
sacrifice, abortion. Such scientists as 
Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict, Alfred 
Kinsey and Frank Beach have shown 
us that homosexual behavior has 
existed throughout man's history, in 
many diverse societies and among 
many animal species. Many cultures 
accept and/or require homosexual acti- 
vity as part of their socialization 
process. Yet it is called unnatural in 
our own country. 

In reality, such terminologyis merely 
camouflage for an early tribal need 
for workers, hunters and warriors. 
Essentially, it is the glorification of 
reproduction as the sole purpose of 
sexual relationships. Few intelligent 
people would accept this idea today, but 
it remains a persuasive factor in jus- 
tifying antihomosexual theory.. The 
real issue, masked in verbal cliche is 
the justification of majority behavior 
and the proscription or elimination of 
minority behavior. 

Fallacy II - Homosexuality Is Im- 
moral. Again, the semantic problem is 
evident, "Moral" and "immoral" are 
judgmental terms relative to time, 
place, and the needs of the majority. 
For example, various societies and eras 
have defined antisemitism and anti- 
black pogroms as moral while others 
have not. The basic problem is to 
establish a durable definition of moral 



and immoral which applies to all times 
and to all places. Joheph Fletcher and 
Norman Pittenger, among others, sug- 
gest such definitions: Any behavior or 
attitude manifesting selfless loving 
concern for another person is moral, 
and any behavior or attitude bringing 
physical or mental harm to another 
person is immoral. 

There are two overriding considera- 
tions which must be borne in mind: 
1) homosexual relations between con- 
senting individuals bring joy, not harm, 
and are therefore moral; 2) individual 
man must not be manipulated by gov- 
ernment, church, or society to fulfill 
goals inimical to the happiness of indi- 
vidual citizens when their happiness 
does not infringe upon the rights of 
other individual citizens. 

Fallacy II - Homosexuality Is an Al- 
ness. This currently popular theory is 
a glaring example of the contemporary 
mania for calling tastes, habits, and 
behavior which differ from one's own 
"sick." The famed Wolfenden Com- 
mission in Great Britain and the "kin- 
sey Institute" in the United States have 
exposed the fallacy of these views. Dr. 
Kinsey's research found that one-third 
of the adult male population has had a 
homosexual experience to the point of 
orgasm while one-half of that" same 
population is capable of homosexual 
response. (The discrepancy between the 
two figures is the result of societal 
pressures favoring a heterosexual 
"norm" and suppressing an Individual's 
homosexual desires, a fact which has 
been detrimental to families and jobs 
when the clash between homosexual 
desires and antihomosexual pressures 
became too grate.) The consequence of 
Kinsey's findings is that one-third to 
one-half of the male population is either 
"sick" to some degree or that some- 
thing is basically wrong with the 
majority's "illness theory." 

The essential questions are clear. 
Are meaningful expressions of emotion 
only valid between members of oppo- 
site sexes? Is the- sole purpose of 
intense human relationships mechani- 
cal reproduction? Is the strength of a 
society founded upon its sameness 
rather than its diversity? 

Perhaps Henry David Thoreau pro- 
vided the answer when he wrote "Let 
every man mind his own business and 
endeavor to be what he was made." 
The time has come for the homosexual 
to be what he was made, not the gro- 
tesque outcast which the heterosexual 
population would have him be. 




If you do not recognize the visage 
that pears out at you; his identity is 
German (circa 1945). The sockets have 
eyes for he has come back to life. He 
is the Ghost of Nuremburg. Nurem- 
burg, where the U.S., against the will 
of France and England, decided to act 
as moral judge to the fallen supermen, 
I wonder if the men who tried and 
convicted Nazi war criminals ever 
considered the possibility of Americans 
being tried for similar atrocities? Well, 
the trial has come. 

However, a major difference in this 
sort of trial has occurred. Instead of 
Generals and Ministers of War we try 
sargeants and junior officers. Let's face 
it, only a few misguided sickies could 
have pulled off My Lai, but is it only 
a few? Not too many months ago a 
group of ex-servicemen (hundreds, in 
fact) came to Chicago to confess war 
crimes committed in South Vietnam. 



Except for a back page of the New 
York Times, the incident received little 
or no publicity. (Many of those men 
will be returning theirmedals in April's 
march on Washington.) 

Calley and the men who were tried 
with him were not born murderers; but 
were trained for the part. Many days 
of kill training, react and shoot, seek 
and destroy, left their marks. Then a 
day comes bringing 95-degree weather, 
feet soaked in mud, buddy catches a 
blast of AK-47 in the head, you see 
faces but they dissolve to just an image, 
ENEMY! - react and kiU, burn and 
destroy. Your weapon fires a thousand 
rounds a minute, 2 minutes and then 
you step back. 

Oh God, they're all dead. Our si- 
lence has helped killed them, Don't 
Forget. 

Al Niemi 







CYCLE 



SPORTS 




BASEBALL BEGINS 



The baseball team began working out 
last week in preparation for the season's 
opener April 8th, against a new op- 
ponent, Suffolk University. Under Coach 
Carson and Assistant Coach Johnson the 
team was put through strenuous exer- 
cises and drills. The pitchers began 
throwing and working out the "winter 
kinks" that were felt by all. The team 
lost only three players due tograduation 
and are looking forward to a very 
successful season. 

Home games are planned for Croker 
Field (off of upper Main Street) and 
they hope for a good turnout. 
Dave Reid?! 



STEVE MAGER SELECTED AREA IV ALL - STARS 



Steve Mager, (lie leading scorer, and 
rebounder for the Filchburg State Fal- 
cons., was selected to the Area IV 
All-Star Team this past week. Mager, 
who scored 476 points for a 22.6 point 
per game (ppg) average, also had 340 
rebounds for a 16.3 rebounds per game 
(rpg). Mager, who graduated from Notre 
Dame High School last year, will be a 
maior factor in the success of the Fal- 
cons for the next three years. 

Following Mager in scoring and re- 
bounding was Senior Co-Captain Don 
Cranson who had 290 points (13.8 ppg) 
and 191 rebounds (9,1 rpg). He also led 
the team in assists with 41. Steve Fin- 
neron, Junior Co-Captain, was second in 
assists with 37 and thrid in scoring 
with 182 points (8.6 ppg). Rounding 



out the top four scorers was Mike 
Sireci with 161 points (7.6 ppg) and third 
in rebounds with 149 (7.0 rpg). 

The team ended the season with 7 
wins against 14 defeats, scoring 1,307 
points (62.2 ppg) as compared to 1,445 
(68.8 ppg) for the opposition. 

FALCON REBOUNDS 

The basketball team will surely miss 
the leadership of Don Cranson next year 
as he will be graduating in June. With 
a little luck the Falcons' record could 
have been alot better because the scores 
were very close in most of the games. 

Good luck next year! 

Dave Reid 



G and L CUSTOM CYCLE 



. 



CHOPPERS BUILT TO ORDER 

PARTS SERVICE 

WELDING 

104 Lunenburg St. Fitchburg, Mass. 

TEL. 343-9491 

George Vasios Ed McHugh 



* K The 



SUMMER ST. 



FITCHBURG 



GRAND OPENING 

**** April 1-2-3 **** 

IIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII 

Specializing in HIKING 
FISHING CAMPING 



Hiking Shoes $16.95 
Back Packs $9.95 



Jim Buckley Gen. Mgr. 



EVEN FACULTY 
ARENT HONEST 




THE DRAFT" 

Their will be a series 

of lectures on the DRAFT 

held every Wednesday 

for all intrested people. 

The time and room 
number will be posted 
Courtesy of 
S.G.A. & Faculty 



On February 22nd, 1971 (Monday) 
some time after 8:00 a,m. someone 
struck this parked car while attempt- 
ing to park next to it. 

The operator of the striking vehicle 
got out of it, examined the damage to 
the parked car, then returned to his 
own car and drove to a space several 
cars away in the same lot. 

The parking lot in question is the 
North Street Staff lot, adjacent to the 
Science Building and Weston Auditorium. 

Up to six Fitchburg State College 
students were walking through this lot 
and could not have avoided seeing the 
accident. These students were seen in 
the area by a faculty member witness 
and it is assumed they were on their 
way to class at Weston Auditorium 0-* 
the McDKay Campus School. 

The person who struck my car is 
responsible for damage to therightfront 
door of my 1970 Dodge Polora 4-door 
sedan, color mediumblue metallic, black 
vinyl top. 

Would the students in the area at that 
time please reply in person and in 
writing to the Instructional Media Of- 
fice, Edgerly Hall, as soon as possible? 

Thank you very much for helping to 
see that justice is done! 

A Member of the General Staff 



All information is strictly confidential 



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